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Nu-U Fitness Blog

Why Medical Fitness?

Our personal training and medical fitness business has been in development for the past 2 years.  It offers evidence based progressive fitness and nutrition programs for those that have chronic diseases, post surgical fitness needs, and those that need weight management guidance.

The medical fitness industry is growing and is predicted to be the next fitness and wellness trend.  The attraction is that a medical fitness facility focuses on overall wellness instead of just fitness. It’s possible to be physically fit, or working toward physical fitness, and still experience ill health. The purpose of our medical fitness facility isn’t just to help clients lose weight or gain muscle, but to help them manage their health.

Being evidence based and having a referral system in place helps us integrate with healthcare facilities so that our clients can be overseen by their medical professional as they work towards their fitness goals.  The medical professionals help ensure that our clients are meeting goals and are a secondary support and accountability system and vice versa.
We bridge the gap to improve the continuum of care so that not just health is improved but lifestyle.

With health care costs on the rise, and with the future of the U.S. health insurance industry uncertain, using exercise as a preventive and restorative health tool is more important than ever.

San Antonio Personal Trainer Felicia M’s 12 Round Workout

12 Round (Advanced Routine)

Round 1: 

30 second plank

Weighted 30 second plank w/ 25lb plate

Round 2:

2 squats w/ 25lb dumbbells

Weighted Step-ups (2 each leg w/ 25lb dumbbells)

30 second plank

Weighted 30 second plank w/25lb plate

Round 3:   

3 Tuck Jumps

3 squats with Trapbar (@95 lbs)

2 squats w/ 25lb dumbbells

Weighted Step-ups (2 each leg w/ 25lb dumbbells)

30 second plank

Weighted 30 second plank w/25lb plate

Round 4: 

4 Deep Swimmer’s Press (8lb dumbbells)

4 Upright Rows (20 lb exercise bar)

3 Tuck Jumps

3 squats with Trapbar (@95 lbs)

2 squats w/ 25lb dumbbells

Weighted Step-ups (2 each leg w/ 25lb dumbbells)

30 second plank

Weighted 30 second plank w/25lb plate

Round 5:

5 Push-ups

5 Dumbbell Flies to Bent Over Rows Combo

4 Deep Swimmer’s Press (8lb dumbbells)

4 Upright Rows (20 lb exercise bar)

3 Tuck Jumps

3 squats with Trapbar (@95 lbs)

2 squats w/ 25lb dumbbells

Weighted Step-ups (2 each leg w/ 25lb dumbbells)

30 second plank

Weighted 30 second plank w/25lb plate

Round 6:

6 Burpees

6 weighted jump squats (20lb dumbbells)

5 Push-ups

5 Dumbbell Flies to Bent Over Rows Combo

4 Deep Swimmer’s Press (8lb dumbbells)

4 Upright Rows (20 lb exercise bar)

3 Tuck Jumps

3 squats with Trapbar (@95 lbs)

2 squats w/ 25lb dumbbells

Weighted Step-ups (2 each leg w/ 25lb dumbbells)

30 second plank

Weighted 30 second plank w/25lb plate

Round 7:

7 Hip Thrusts (weighted – 25lb plate)

7 Stiff Leg Deadlifts (w/25lb dumbbells)

6 Burpees

6 weighted jump squats (20lb dumbbells)

5 Push-ups

5 Dumbbell Flies to Bent Over Rows Combo

4 Deep Swimmer’s Press (8lb dumbbells)

4 Upright Rows (20 lb exercise bar)

3 Tuck Jumps

3 squats with Trapbar (@95 lbs)

2 squats w/ 25lb dumbbells

Weighted Step-ups (2 each leg w/ 25lb dumbbells)

30 second plank

Weighted 30 second plank w/25lb plate

Round 8:                               

8 Mountain Climbers

8 Leg Curls (35 lbs)

7 Hip Thrusts (weighted – 25lb plate)

7 Stiff Leg Deadlifts (w/25lb dumbbells)

6 Burpees

6 weighted jump squats (20lb dumbbells)

5 Push-ups

5 Dumbbell Flies to Bent Over Rows Combo

4 Deep Swimmer’s Press (8lb dumbbells)

4 Upright Rows (20 lb exercise bar)

3 Tuck Jumps

3 squats with Trapbar (@95 lbs)

2 squats w/ 25lb dumbbells

Weighted Step-ups (2 each leg w/ 25lb dumbbells)

30 second plank

Weighted 30 second plank w/25lb plate

Round 9: 

9 Jumping Jacks

9 Dumbbell Squat Thrusts w/ 20lb dumbbells

8 Mountain Climbers

8 Leg Curls (35 lbs)

7 Hip Thrusts (weighted – 25lb plate)

7 Stiff Leg Deadlifts (w/25lb dumbbells)

6 Burpees

6 weighted jump squats (20lb dumbbells)

5 Push-ups

5 Dumbbell Flies to Bent Over Rows Combo

4 Deep Swimmer’s Press (8lb dumbbells)

4 Upright Rows (20 lb exercise bar)

3 Tuck Jumps

3 squats with Trapbar (@95 lbs)

2 squats w/ 25lb dumbbells

Weighted Step-ups (2 each leg w/ 25lb dumbbells)

30 second plank

Weighted 30 second plank w/25lb plate

Round 10:

10 Bicycle Crunches

10 Hanging Leg Raises (weighted – 6lb medicine ball)

9 Jumping Jacks

9 Dumbbell Squat Thrusts w/ 20lb dumbbells

8 Mountain Climbers

8 Leg Curls (35 lbs)

7 Hip Thrusts (weighted – 25lb plate)

7 Stiff Leg Deadlifts (w/25lb dumbbells)

6 Burpees

6 weighted jump squats (20lb dumbbells)

5 Push-ups

5 Dumbbell Flies to Bent Over Rows Combo

4 Deep Swimmer’s Press (8lb dumbbells)

4 Upright Rows (20 lb exercise bar)

3 Tuck Jumps

3 squats with Trapbar (@95 lbs)

2 squats w/ 25lb dumbbells

Weighted Step-ups (2 each leg w/ 25lb dumbbells)

30 second plank

Weighted 30 second plank w/25lb plate

Round 11:

11 Jump Squats

11 Squats (25lb dumbbells)

10 Bicycle Crunches

10 Hanging Leg Raises (weighted – 6lb medicine ball)

9 Jumping Jacks

9 Dumbbell Squat Thrusts w/ 20lb dumbbells

8 Mountain Climbers

8 Leg Curls (35 lbs)

7 Hip Thrusts (weighted – 25lb plate)

7 Stiff Leg Deadlifts (w/25lb dumbbells)

6 Burpees

6 weighted jump squats (20lb dumbbells)

5 Push-ups

5 Dumbbell Flies to Bent Over Rows Combo

4 Deep Swimmer’s Press (8lb dumbbells)

4 Upright Rows (20 lb exercise bar)

3 Tuck Jumps

3 squats with Trapbar (@95 lbs)

2 squats w/ 25lb dumbbells

Weighted Step-ups (2 each leg w/ 25lb dumbbells)

30 second plank

Weighted 30 second plank w/25lb plate

Round 12:

12 alternating forward/reverse lunge (each leg)

12 leg extensions (moderate weight)

11 Jump Squats

11 Squats (25lb dumbbells)

10 Bicycle Crunches

10 Hanging Leg Raises (weighted – 6lb medicine ball)

9 Jumping Jacks

9 Dumbbell Squat Thrusts w/ 20lb dumbbells

8 Mountain Climbers

8 Leg Curls (35 lbs)

7 Hip Thrusts (weighted – 25lb plate)

7 Stiff Leg Deadlifts (w/25lb dumbbells)

6 Burpees

6 weighted jump squats (20lb dumbbells)

5 Push-ups

5 Dumbbell Flies to Bent Over Rows Combo

4 Deep Swimmer’s Press (8lb dumbbells)

4 Upright Rows (20 lb exercise bar)

3 Tuck Jumps

3 squats with Trapbar (@95 lbs)

2 squats w/ 25lb dumbbells

Weighted Step-ups (2 each leg w/ 25lb dumbbells)

30 second plank

Weighted 30 second plank w/25lb plate

Lifting Weights As You Age Cuts Your Risk Of Early Death By 46%

Nu-U Fitness has a growing demographic of 65 years of age and above.  We are delighted to have individuals start strength training at any age!

Enjoy this article and email, text, or call with any questions.

——————————————————

The secret to a longer life may be a barbell: Strength training as you age reduces your risk for death, according to a new study from Penn State College of Medicine.

Researchers surveyed people age 65 or older about their exercise habits and then tracked them for 15 years. Nearly a third of the study participants died during that period.

Less than 10 percent of the subjects strength trained, but those select few were 46 percent less likely to die during the study than everyone else.

Sure, you could say that older folks who lift must be in better health to begin with. But even after adjusting for BMI, chronic conditions like diabetes and hypertension, and habits like total physical activity, drinking, and smoking, lifting was linked to a 19 percent reduced risk of death.

Strength training can keep you active and independent in your golden years, says study author Jennifer Kraschnewski, M.D. Not only does it strengthen your muscles, resulting in better stamina and balance, but it also increases your bone density.

Together, those factors reduce your risk for falls and fractures—major causes of disability for older people.

Plus, you’ll burn more calories throughout the day just by having more muscle mass on your frame, which helps you maintain a healthy weight, Dr. Kraschnewski says.

So if you’re already lifting, don’t retire your dumbbells.

Want to start? Strength training can be safe for just about anyone, but if you’re over age 65 and inactive, talk to your doctor about any special precautions you should take, she says. Consider enlisting a trainer to create a program designed around any creaky knees or tight hips.

Don’t think that your age will hold you back, though.

“Older adults have the ability to achieve strength similar to those decades younger by engaging in simple strength training routines,” says Dr. Kraschnewski.

March 23, 2016 of Men’s Health

Senior Fitness 101

San Antonio Senior Fitness:

Regular exercise and physical activity are important to the physical and mental health of almost everyone, including older adults. Being physically active can help you continue to do the things you enjoy and stay independent as you age. Regular physical activity over long periods of time can produce long-term health benefits. That’s why health experts say that older adults should be active every day to maintain their health.

In addition, regular exercise and physical activity can reduce the risk of developing some diseases and disabilities that develop as people grow older. In some cases, exercise is an effective treatment for many chronic conditions. For example, studies show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. Exercise also helps people with high blood pressure, balance problems, or difficulty walking.

One of the great things about physical activity is that there are so many ways to be active. For example, you can be active in short spurts throughout the day, or you can set aside specific times of the day on specific days of the week to exercise.

As always, consult your doctor before beginning any exercise program.

 

Nu-U Fitness offers fitness for seniors. Please contact us for more information.

kelly@nu-ufitness.com

210.901.8FIT

Chronic Disease Weight Loss Programs

Do you have a chronic disease?

If you have a chronic disease or condition, you might have questions about exercising. How often can you exercise? Which exercises are safe? Understand the basics about exercise and chronic disease.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

How can exercise improve a chronic disease or condition?

If you have a chronic disease or condition, regular exercise can help you manage symptoms and improve your health.

Aerobic exercise can help to improve your heart health and endurance and aid in weight loss. Strength training can improve muscle strength and endurance, make it easier to do daily activities, slow disease-related declines in muscle strength, and provide stability to joints. Flexibility exercises may help you to have optimal range of motion about your joints, so they can function best, and stability exercises may help reduce the risk of falls.

For example:

  • Heart disease. Regular exercise can help improve your heart health. Recent studies have shown that interval training is often tolerated well in people with heart disease, and it can produce significant benefits.
  • Diabetes. Regular exercise can help insulin more effectively lower your blood sugar level. Physical activity also can help you control your weight and boost your energy.
  • Asthma. Often, exercise can help control the frequency and severity of asthma attacks.
  • Back pain. Regular low-impact aerobic activities can increase strength and endurance in your back and improve muscle function. Abdominal and back muscle exercises (core-strengthening exercises) may help reduce symptoms by strengthening the muscles around your spine.
  • Arthritis. Exercise can reduce pain, help maintain muscle strength in affected joints and reduce joint stiffness.

What exercises are safe?

Your doctor might recommend specific exercises to reduce pain or build strength. Depending on your condition, you might also need to avoid certain exercises altogether or during flare-ups. In some cases, you might need to consult a physical therapist, occupational therapist, or personal trainer before starting to exercise.

If you have low back pain, for example, you might choose low-impact aerobic activities, such as walking and swimming. These types of activities won’t strain or jolt your back.

If you have exercise-induced asthma, you might choose activities that involve short bursts of activity — such as tennis or baseball. If you use an inhaler, be sure to keep it handy while you exercise.

If you have arthritis, the exercises that are best for you will depend on the type of arthritis and which joints are involved. Work with your doctor or a physical therapist to create an exercise plan that will give you the most benefit with the least aggravation on your joints.

How often, how much and at what intensity can I safely exercise?

Before starting an exercise routine, it’s important to talk to your doctor about how long your exercise sessions can be and what level of intensity is safe for you.

If you haven’t been active for a while, start slowly and build up gradually. Ask your doctor what kind of exercise goals you can safely set for yourself as you progress.

Do I need to take special steps before getting started?

Depending on your condition, your doctor might recommend certain precautions before exercising.

If you have diabetes, for example, keep in mind that physical activity lowers blood sugar. Check your blood sugar level before any activity. If you take insulin or diabetes medications that lower blood sugar, you might need to eat a snack before exercising to help prevent low blood sugar.

If you have arthritis, consider taking a warm shower before you exercise. Heat can relax your joints and muscles and relieve any pain you might have before you begin. Also, be sure to choose shoes that provide shock absorption and stability during exercise.

What kind of discomfort can I expect?

Talk to your doctor about what kind of discomfort you might expect during or after exercise, as well as any tips for minimizing your pain. Find out what type or degree of pain might be normal and what might be a sign of something more serious.

If you have heart disease, for example, signs or symptoms that you should stop exercising include dizziness, unusual shortness of breath, chest pain or an irregular heartbeat.

What else do I need to know?

Starting a regular exercise routine can be tough.

To help you stick with your routine, consider exercising with a friend or working with a personal trainer. You might also ask your doctor to recommend an exercise program for people who have your condition, perhaps through a local hospital, clinic or health club.

To stay motivated, choose activities that are fun, set realistic goals and celebrate your progress.

How can a Fitness Professional or Personal Trainer benefit me?

A personal trainer serves as your fitness coach and great motivator! Whether you’re just starting an exercise program, or are an experienced exercise patient, a personal trainer can help you meet your health goals. Always check with your doctor first though before you increase your physical activity levels and ensure your health care professional advises you on the best exercise to suit your disease condition or health problems. Different diseases respond to different exercise programs.

Personal training usually includes:

A health and exercise evaluation. This is a series of tests – overall fitness, flexibility, muscle strength and endurance – used to measure your fitness level. Your trainer should ask about your health conditions, medications and exercise experience. An assessment of your health and fitness to exercise may also be provided by your doctor to the personal trainer.

A personalized exercise and health program.There is no one-size-fits-all approach to exercise and health. A personal trainer will create an exercise program for you based on your goals, interests, ability level and schedule. Your trainer will modify the program as goals are met.

Supervised exercise. Your Personal Trainer should teach you proper exercise techniques that minimize injury risk and maximize results. If you have a question or your posture or outcomes are not achieved, your trainer should be right there to help you. Also, he or she can encourage you to keep going when you feel like giving up!

But we all need support and motivation to keep enjoying exercising!

Share any concerns you might have about your exercise program — from getting started to keeping it up — with your doctor.

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/exercise-and-chronic-disease/art-20046049

 

Weight loss programs, calorie counters, work out videos, diets, etc but which one is right for you? Our weight loss programs incorporate proper nutrition, strength training, and cardiovascular training for safe and timely weight loss results. Each and every program from Nu-U Fitness is designed specifically to you based on your personal goals and lifestyle.  We maintain your weight loss accountability through email, text, and follow up meetings along with your personal training sessions.

 

Let us take the guess work out of your program!  As always, please speak to your physician before starting an exercise program.

Kelly@nu-ufitness.com

210.901.8FIT

Personal Training for Weight Loss and Health

Weight loss programs, calorie counters, work out videos, diets, etc but which one is right for you?  Our San Antonio personal trainers build weight loss programs that incorporate proper strength training and cardiovascular training for safe and timely weight loss results.

Each and every weight loss program is designed specifically to you based on your personal goals and lifestyle.  Our personal trainers maintain your weight loss accountability through email, text, and follow up meetings along with your personal training sessions.

Why is it beneficial to have a personal trainer help you build a weight loss program?

Utilizing one of our personal trainers is one of the fastest, easiest, most successful ways to improve your health and fitness.

The primary reason people hire personal trainers is to get professional assistance to improve your cardio, strength, flexibility, endurance, posture, balance and coordination.  Our personal trainers monitor your progress and fine-tune your weight loss program as you go, helping you work your way through plateaus.

Our personal trainers will help you reach or maintain your ideal weight by setting realistic goals and prescribing safe weight loss strategies while providing the encouragement you need.

Our personal trainers help you stick with a well-intentioned plan which can be one of the biggest challenges in your weight loss journey.  Our personal trainers will provide motivation for developing a lifestyle that places a high priority on health and activity.  Our personal trainers will help brainstorm ways to overcome your biggest obstacles to exercise and nutrition.

Our personal trainers will help you achieve maximum results in minimum time with a weight loss program designed to use your strengths and improve on your weaknesses.

Not only will our weight loss program help with exercise and lifestyle but our personal trainers are known for being doorways to personal growth experiences.  Our personal trainers provide mind-body activities that will uncover new insights about yourself or assist in uncovering potential you didn’t realize you had!

Ultimately, our personal trainers are with you every step of the way.

Contact:

210.901.8FIT

Kelly@nu-ufitness.com

Fun Fitness Facts: Learn a history lesson on a few pieces of fitness equipment

Fun Fitness Facts you may have never even thought about!

Fun Fitness Fact 1:

Where did the Kettle bell come from?

The kettlebell as we know it today originated in Russia approximately 350 years ago. The first appearance of the word in a Russian dictionary appeared in 1704. They were originally used as handled counterweights to weigh out dry goods on market scales. People started throwing them around for entertainment and they were later put to use for weight lifting.

The forefather of the modern fitness gym, Dr. Vladislav Krayevsky, founded the St. Petersburg Amateur Weightlifting Society on August 10,1885, considered the birth of weightlifting in Russia. A proponent of what he called “heavy athletics”, in 1900 Krayevsky wrote “The Development of Physical Strength with Kettlebells and without Kettlebells”. He was one of the most influential pioneers in fitness of his day. His students included the legendary strongman George Hackenscmidt, “The Russian Lion”, who credited him with teaching him everything he knew and Eugene Sandow, “The Father of Modern Day Body Building”.

Kettlebell Sport lifting (Girevoy Sport) is the National Sport of Russia. Today exercising with kettlebells is undergoing a major resurgence and kettlebell training has now become one of the most popular and best ways to lose weight, maintain a high level of cardio-vascular fitness, get stronger and get that sculpted, toned, healthy & beautiful body you’ve always wanted. Proper kettlebell training can help you to live a longer, healthier life. Joint health, mobility and flexibility can all be maintained, and even improved, with the correct application of kettlebell movements. Kettlebell lifting is technical just like Olympic lifting, and requires the lifter to use the correct form to avoid injury and to derive the maximum benefit from any of the hundreds of kettlebell exercises and variations.

Kettlebell USA

Fun Fitness Fact 2:

Why a Swiss ball is named a Swiss ball?

The physical object known as a “Swiss Ball” was developed in 1963 by Aquilino Cosani, an Italian plastics manufacturer. He perfected a process for moulding large puncture-resistant plastic balls.[1] Those balls, then known as “Pezzi balls”, were first used in treatment programs for newborns and infants by Mary Quinton, a British physiotherapist working in Switzerland. Later, Dr. Susanne Klein-Vogelbach, the director at the Physical Therapy School in Basel, Switzerland, integrated the use of ball exercise as physical therapy for neuro-developmental treatment. Based on the concept of “functional kinetics”,[2] Klein-Vogelbach advocated the use of ball techniques to treat adults with orthopedic or medical problems.

The term “Swiss Ball” was used when American physical therapists began to use those techniques in North America after witnessing their benefits in Switzerland.[3] From their development as physical therapy in a clinical setting, those exercises are now used in athletic training,[4] as part of a general fitness routine [5] and incorporation in alternative exercises such as yoga and Pilates.[6] in 2012, Neil Whyte completed the record for the fastest time 10 swiss balls have been jumped across at 8.31 seconds.The record for the farthest jump between two swiss balls was also made by Neil at a distance of 2.3 meters in 2012 [7]

Wikipedia

Fun Fitness Fact 3:

Why a medicine ball named a medicine ball?

While details are sparse on the history of medicine balls, we can reliably track their usage back around 3000 years, where they were used by Persian wrestlers looking to become stronger. In Ancient Greece, Hippocrates considered them to be an essential tool for helping injured people regain mobility and he advised people to use them as a general, all purpose way of remaining healthy.

This all brings us back to the origin of the name. The word “medicine” was long synonymous with the word “health”. For example, it’s noted that Renaissance physician Hieronymus Mercurialis advised that people of all fitness levels should use what we would recognise as medicine balls in his book De Arte Gymnastica, as part of what he called “medicinal gymnastics“. The use of the word “medicinal” in this case was to highlight how the exercises could be used as both a way of healing injuries and preventing them in the first place through general fitness.

Medicine Ball

Fun Fitness Fact 4:

Why a dumbbell is named a dumbbell?

The forerunner of the dumbbell, halteres, were used in ancient Greece as lifting weights[1][2] and also as weights in the ancient Greek version of the long jump.[3] A kind of dumbbell was also used in India for more than a millennium, shaped like a club – so it was named Indian club. Despite their common English name implying an Indian origin, the so-called Indian clubs were in fact created in the Near East. Properly referred to as meels, they are first recorded as being used by wrestlers in ancient Persia, Egypt and the Middle East.[citation needed] The practice has continued to the present day, notably in the Varzesh-e Bastan tradition practiced in the zurkaneh of Iran. From Persia, the Mughals brought the meels to South Asia where are still used by pehlwan (wrestlers). British colonists first came across Persian meels in India, and erroneously referred to them as “Indian clubs” despite their Middle Eastern origin. The design of the “Nal”, as the equipment was referred to, can be seen as a halfway point between a barbell and a dumbbell. It was generally used in pairs, in workouts by wrestlers, bodybuilders, sports players, and others wishing to increase strength and muscle size.

The term “dumbbell” or “dumb bell” originated in late Stuart England. In 1711 the poet Joseph Addison mentioned exercising with a “dumb bell” in an essay published in The Spectator (1711).[4] Although Addison elsewhere in the same publication describes having used equipment similar to the modern understanding of dumbbells, according to sport historian Jan Todd, the form of the first dumbbells remains unclear.[4] The Oxford English Dictionary describes “apparatus similar to that used to ring a church bell, but without the bell, so noiseless or ‘dumb’”, implying the action of pulling a bell rope to practise English bellringing.[5]

Wikipedia

The Ultimate Guide To Fat Loss (How To Lose Fat Faster)

The Ultimate Guide To Fat Loss (How To Lose Fat Faster)

Do you want to lose body fat? Do you want to have fat loss in a health way?

This fat loss resource introduces you to the best and most effective fat loss strategies.

I have hand-picked the best fat loss blog posts on the web. In different chapters, you’ll learn how to lose fat fast, build muscle, foods you should eat, calories and portion control, metabolism and much more.

Frankly, the information is this guide is priceless – bookmark this page for future references.

It’s time to lose body fat, get lean, and stay healthy!

The Ultimate Fat Loss Guide

Click on the chapter you are interested in and it’ll jump to that chapter (without loading the page).

Pick one chapter now and get started!

Chapter 1: Weight Loss Basics

Chapter 2: Everything You Need To Know About Calories

Chapter 3: Foods and Beverages That Will Help You Lose Weight

Chapter 4: Metabolism and Weight Loss Hormones

Chapter 5: Weight Loss Myths and Mistakes You Should Avoid

Chapter 6: Strength Training for Weight Loss

Chapter 7: Interval Training and Cardio

Chapter 8: Weight Loss Motivation and Setting Goals

Chapter 9: Weight Loss Success Stories

Chapter 10: More Weight Loss Tips

If you like this fat loss guide, share it with your family and friends.

Chapter 1: Fat Loss Basics

If you are new to fat loss there are a few things you should know.

Firstly, to lose fat you have to maintain a calorie deficit, eat healthy and exercise.

It’s worth noting that fat comes off fast the first few weeks of maintaining a calorie deficit, but as time goes by, fat loss slows down.

Second, your diet should consist of the three macronutrients – that is, proteins, fats and carbs. How much protein should you eat? Should you eat carbs? Are fats healthy? All these questions will be answered in the guide.

Thirdly, there are other things that affect fat loss like, metabolism, hormones – and I have dedicated a whole chapter about them.

Here are the articles for fat loss basics:

25 Diet and Exercise Tips That Will Completely Transform Your Body| Focus Fitness

A Beginner’s Guide to Healthy Eating | Nerd Fitness

What is the Best Macronutrient Ratio for Weight Loss? | Coach Calorie

What’s the best diet? | Precision Nutrition

“The Basics of Losing Stored Body Fat” by James Barnum | Eat To Perform

Chapter 2: Everything You Need To Know About Calories

In this chapter, you’ll learn everything you need to know about calories. Realize that you can’t lose fat if you don’t get your calories right.

These 6 resources will show you how to set calorie deficits, track meals, portion control and so on.

Setting the Deficit – Small, Moderate or Large | Body Recomposition

How to Track Calories and Log Your Diet the Right Way |Ben Greenfield Fitness

The Caloric Deficit Cheat Sheet | Body For Wife

7 Ways to Lose Weight Without Counting Calories, Tracking Points, or Going Crazy | Tony Gentilcore

Guide to Calorie Control | Precision Nutrition

11 Ways to Burn More Calories | Fitness Magazine

Chapter 3: Foods and Beverages You Should Eat

There’s usually a lot of confusion about what foods you should or shouldn’t eat. These fat loss resources will show you the foods you should eat for fast fat loss, and what you should avoid.

Don’t just get your calories from any foods. Make sure you eat nutrient rich foods.

The 11 Most Nutrient Dense Foods on the Planet | Authority Nutrition

Does Alcohol Prevent Weight Loss, or Cause Fat Gain? | Built Lean

The Surprising Truth about Sugar and Weight Loss | Muscle Evo

The Top Fat-Burning Foods | Health

Water & 6 Other Weight Loss Drinks | Now Loss

Protein Intake – How Much Protein Should You Eat Per Day? | Authority Nutrition

Eat Fat To Burn More Fat! | Bodybuilding

Best Carbs For Weight Loss | Shape

Chapter 4: Metabolism and Fat Loss Hormones

Metabolism seems to be blamed every time someone can’t lose fat. Here you’ll learn how you can speed up your metabolism and keep fat loss hormones balanced.

15 Easy Things You Can Do To Fight Inflammation & Boost Your Metabolism | Mind Body Green

3 Steps to reverse a slow metabolism naturally! | Butter Nutrition

Nine Things that Improve Insulin Sensitivity: Accelerate Weight Loss & Build Muscle Faster | Poliquin Group

Are These Four Hormones Blocking Your Weight Loss Efforts? | Dr. Sara Gottfried MD

6 Ways to Naturally Boost Your Metabolism | Daily Burn

9 Tips to Help Balance Hormones | Wellness Mama

Chapter 5: Fat Loss Myths and Mistakes You Should Avoid

There are a lot of myths online about fat loss. These myths can derail your results or make it impossible for you to lose weight. Unless you stick to only what works, you’ll end up wasting a lot of time and money.

Here are some common fat loss myths you should avoid.

Starvation Mode: Is It A Myth? Is It Real? Is Your Body In It Right Now? | A Workout Routine

The Fat-Burning Zone: Bursting The Myth |Jillian Michaels

The Meal Timing Myth? | Born Fitness

Metabolism-Boosting Myths | Paleo Leap

9 Diet and Exercise Myths that People Won’t Stop Believing | Kimberly Snyder

8 Common Weight Loss Mistakes You Should Avoid | Coach Calorie

Chapter 6: Strength Training for Fat Loss

Even though it’s possible to lose fat without strength training, it’s not a good idea.

You see, maintaining a calorie deficit without strength training leads to loss of muscle. Strength training will increase muscles mass, boost metabolism and burn fat faster. The 4 articles will show you how to use strength training for healthy fat loss.

Strength Training For Weight Loss | Girls Gone Strong

Bodyweight Strength Training: Beginners Guide | Strength Bound

The Benefits of Strength Training: Lose Fat, Get Strong | Fitocracy

The Only 7 Bodyweight Exercises You Need To Build Muscle and Strength | Focus Fitness

Chapter 7: Interval Training and Cardio

Interval training and cardio will improve your cardiovascular health, build muscle (HIIT), and burn more fat. These resources will teach you how to use these two forms of training.

7 Interval Training Workouts To Burn Fat Fast | Built Lean

Why High-Intensity Interval Training is Best For Weight Loss | Muscle For Life

5 Fat-burning Running Programmes | Men’s Health

The Cardio Weight Loss Plan | Born Fitness

How to Burn More Fat With HIIT: Workout Included | Emily Skye

How to Lose Fat with Cardio: Long Duration Cardio vs HIIT | StrongLifts

Chapter 8: Fat Loss Motivation and Setting Goals

Frankly, fat loss can be frustrating at times. And it’s easy to give up if you are not motivated or haven’t set any goals.

In these 4 articles you’ll learn how to overcome lack of motivation, setting realistic goals, rewarding yourself and much more!

18 Ways To Overcome Lack of Motivation To Exercise | Focus Fitness

A Realistic Look At Goal Setting | Leigh Peele

Rewarding Yourself for Your Hard Work! | Cranky Fitness

Weight Loss Motivation: 3 Mind Hacks to Stay Motivated to Lose Weight | Syatt Fitness

Chapter 9: Fat Loss Success Stories

In this chapter, you’ll hear from people who have successfully lost weight. You’ll learn what worked for them and what didn’t. Then you can apply some of the tips they share in your weight loss journey.

How This Family Doctor Lost 75 Pounds Easily Without Portion Control | Forks Over Knives

How I Lost 100 Pounds | James Altucher

How I Lost 40 Pounds By Eating Clean | Mind Body Green

How I Lost 100 Pounds (and 10 Tips On How You Can, Too) | Fooducate

Chapter 10: More Fat Loss Tips

Here are more fat loss tips that can help you get lose fat faster.

How to Lose 25 Pounds in a Month with One Simple Trick | Fat-Burning Man

How to Build Muscle and Lose Fat…at the Same Time | Muscle For Life

20 Tips for Breaking Free from Binge Eating | Nia Shanks

Source

Photo Credit: Client Loretta R.

Recipes that are Easy and Healthy to Aid in Weight and Fat Loss

I’ve designed 3-ingredient healthy meal ideas and recipes that are cheap and easy to prepare.

This article has a one-time solution to all your problems.

If you want to eat healthy but can’t because:

  • You don’t have time to prepare meals
  • You don’t know what to cook
  • Can’t afford healthy foods
  • You lack variety of foods to cook

These meals will increase your satiety and help you lose weight or build muscle. You only have to meet your body’s caloric needs. And just because they’re labeled dinner meals doesn’t mean you can’t eat them in other meals.

Here you go – 25 healthy dinner ideas

Recipes for healthy dinner ideas

Note that these recipe will take less time to cook is you apply these meal prepping tips.

Glazed Salmon With Broccoli Rice

Ingredients

Low-sodium soy sauce, Long-grain white (brown) rice, Chopped broccoli, Skinless salmon fillet, Large red onion, Olive oil, Kosher salt and black pepper

See recipe

Eggs with Black Beans & Spinach

Ingredients
Eggs, Egg whites, Black beans, Chopped spinach, Olive oil

See recipe

Steak with roasted red pepper & corn salsa

Ingredients

Barbecue sauce, Cider vinegar, Molasses, Hot pepper sauce, Flank steak, Cobs of corn, Red bell pepper – seeds and ribs removed, Canned black beans, Chopped green onion, Chopped cilantro or parsley

See recipe

Salad with Grilled Chicken

Ingredients

Boneless, skinless chicken breast, Romaine lettuce, Grape tomatoes, Fresh corn , Avocados, Cheese, Honey, Lime and Cilantro Vinaigrette, Freshly ground black pepper, Olive oil

See recipe

Pasta with Yogurt, Peas, and Chile

Ingredients

Whole-milk Greek yogurt, Olive oil, Garlic- crushed or pressed, Fresh or thawed frozen peas, Kosher salt, Pasta, Pine nuts, Red pepper flakes, Basil leaves, Feta cheese

See recipe

Pan-Seared Salmon with Kale and Whole wheat roll

Ingredients

Salmon fillets , Fresh lemon juice, Olive oil, Kosher salt, Kales, Dates, Honeycrisp apple, Toasted slivered almonds, Freshly ground black pepper, Whole wheat rolls

See recipe

Sweet potatoes with eggs and spinach

Ingredients

Sweet potato- peeled, Extra-virgin olive oil, kosher salt, Yellow or white onions, Packed spinach leaves, Unsalted butterEggs, Goat butter, resh chives, minced

See recipe

Broccoli and Black Bean Rice

Ingredients

Chicken broth, Brown rice, Thyme, Seasoned salt, Black beans, Broccoli

See recipe

Turkey club lettuce wrap

Ingredients

Romaine heart lettuce leaf, Organic deli turkey, Mayonnaise, Tomato slice, Cooked bacon

See recipe

Shrimp, Broccoli and Rice

Ingredients

Olive oil, Butter, Large shrimp, Long grain rice, Garlic and, broccoli

See recipe

Fish with green beans

Ingredients

All-purpose flour, Fresh oregano, Fresh parsley, Kosher salt, Freshly ground pepper, Tilapia fillets, Unsalted butter, Green beans, Garlic, Cherry tomatoes,lemon

See recipe

Tomato Mozzarella Salad

Ingredients

Tomatoes, Mozzarella cheese, Olive oil, Balsamic vinegar, Salt, Ground black pepper, Fresh basil

See recipe

Chicken, Kale, and Sweet Potato Stew

Ingredients

Sweet potatoes, Lacinato kale, Boneless – skinless chicken breasts or thighs, Low-sodium chicken stock, Kosher salt, Italian seasoning, Extra virgin olive oil

See recipe

Grilled Steak with Avocado Tomato Salad

Ingredients

Red onions, Flank steak, Cherry tomatoes, Balsamic vinegar, Peeled avocado

See recipe

Beef and Bean Chili

Ingredients

Olive oil, Red onions, Chopped jalapeño chilies with seeds, Garlic cloves, chopped, Ground beef, Chili powder, Ground cumin, Sweet paprika. Tomatoes, Kidney beans, Beef broth, Sour cream, Cheddar cheese, Green onions, Fresh cilantro

See recipe

Steak with Roasted Green Beans and Brown Rice

Ingredients

Brown rice, Fresh green beans, Olive oil, Skirt steak, Black pepper

See recipe

Creamy Pork and Broccoli Pasta

Ingredients

Broccoli, Sunflower oil, Pork steak, Button mushrooms, Onion- finely diced, Garlic clove, Carrots, White wine, Whipping cream, Long macaroni, Fresh parsley

See recipe

Marinated Tuna Steak with Apple Kale Salad

Ingredients

Tuna Steaks, Fresh basil, Chili powder, Extra virgin olive oil, Lemon juice, Salt & pepper, Shallots, Kale, Chopped apples, Radicchio , Walnut pieces, Coconut oil

See recipe

Sweet Potatoes with White Beans and Kale

Ingredients

Sweet potatoes, Olive oil, Shallot, Garlic clove, minced, Sprig fresh rosemary, Red pepper flakes, Cooked and drained white beans, Kale, Lemon juice, Salt and freshly ground black pepper

See recipe

Final word on these Recipes

Now go ahead and try these recipes. It would be wise to exclude some of the high calorie ingredients if you are wanting to loss weight or are watching your sugar levels or fat levels.

If you have other healthy dinner recipes please share them in the comments below.

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